SWEET ANISE / FENNEL

Sweet anise or fennel is a bulbous vegetable with a tall, wispy, frond top.  Although the fronds can be used as a garnish, the bulb is the star with its crunchy texture and fresh, bright taste.  It has a very distinctive licorice flavor and fragrance.

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how to choose

When choosing anise / fennel, look for bulbs that are clean, solid and firm. They should be whitish or pale green in color with no brown spots or blemishes. Stalks and ferns should be green in color and have the subtle aroma of licorice.

 

how to prepare

Wash thoroughly. Both the bulb and the stalks can all be used in cooking. Cut the stalks away from the bulb at the place where they meet. If you are not going to be using the intact bulb in a recipe, then first cut it in half, remove the base, and then rinse it with water before proceeding to cut it further. The best way to slice anise / fennel is to do so vertically through the bulb. If your recipe requires chunked, diced or julienned fennel, it is best to first remove the harder core that resides in the center before cutting it.

how to store

Wrap in plastic and store anise / fennel in the refrigerator vegetable drawer where it will keep for five to seven days.

where we grow

Our sweet anise / fennel is available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Santa Maria, California, twelve months a year, in Salinas, California from April through November and Scottsdale, Arizona from December through March.  Pure Pacific organic sweet anise / fennel is grown in Salinas and Santa Maria, California from April though November and in Yuma, Arizona from December through March.

BEETS

Beets are an edible root that are vibrant in color and packed with flavor and nutrition. The small or medium beets are generally more tender than larger ones. They have the one of the highest sugar content of any vegetable, with a sweet, earthy flavor.

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how to choose

Select beets that are firm with smooth, hard and show no surface nicks or cuts. Look for uniform dark red or golden yellow color skins and they should be heavy for their size. Avoid beets that have soft spots or shriveled, flabby skin.

 

how to prepare

Rinse the beets and cut away all but an inch of the stalks. Small, young beets are tasty sliced or grated raw in salads. All types are delicious steamed, roasted or boiled. To retain nutrients and color, boil, bake or steam without peeling first. The skin will easily rub off under cold running water after they are cooked. Note: Beet juice can stain, so protect your counter tops.

 

how to store

Do not wash before storing. Remove the stems approximately 2 inches from the root, so they do not pull the moisture away from the root, and refrigerate in a sealed plastic bag.  Squeeze out as much air as possible and they will stay fresh for two to three weeks. They may be frozen, but they must first be cut and peeled before they are stored in an airtight freezer container.

where we grow

Our beets are available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Salinas, California, April through October and then move to the desert in Scottsdale, Arizona for the winter months from November through March.  Pure Pacific organic beets are grown in Salinas and Santa Maria, California from April though November and in Yuma, Arizona from December through March.

BOK CHOY

Bok choy is also known as pak-choi. The name originates from Cantonese dialect and literally means ”white vegetable.” The whole plant is edible and has a cabbage-like flavor with sweet undertones.

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how to choose

When choosing bok choy look for stalks that are pure white and firm with dark green leaves. Avoid wilted, broken, or spotted (rusty) leaves and limp stalks. Larger leaves are best for soups or salads, and smaller heads will speed up cooking time when adding it to a stir-fry.

 

how to prepare

Chop off a half to one inch off the bottom of the stalk before washing. Separate stalks and gently wash them in a bowl of cold water. Bok choy can be added to soup or stir-fry, steamed or eaten raw in a salad.

 

how to store

Store bok choy in a plastic bag in the crisper section of your refrigerator for up to week. Add a paper towel in the bag to absorb any condensation. Wash immediately before serving.

where we grow

We offer conventionally grown bok choy year round from Salinas, California, April through November and from Phoenix, Arizona in the winter months from December through March. 

BROCCOLI

Broccoli is part of the cruciferous vegetable family with Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage as close relatives. The florets are the most commonly part of the vegetable that is consumed, but the stems are also edible. Broccoli’s milder peppery flavor gives it great versatility and allows it to be an easy go-to healthy option.

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how to choose

When selecting a head of broccoli, look for compact, dark-green to purple-green florets on tender stalks. The stem should be firm and the crown should be tight and springy. Yellow flowers, wilted leaves or tough steams should be avoided as these are signs of an older vegetable.

 

current packs available

how to prepare

Wash thoroughly. To prepare the broccoli for cooking, trim leaves and ends of stalks. Cut into florets by removing each head. Including a small piece of the stem is okay. Peel stems with a vegetable peeler and cut into pieces. Broccoli can also be eaten raw, roasted, sauteed, steamed, blanched or raw.

 

how to store

Place unwashed broccoli in a sealed plastic bag and store in the vegetable drawer of your refrigerator. It will keep up to five days in the refrigerator. Blanch before freezing for a longer term option.

where we grow

Our broccoli is available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Salinas, California, February through December, in Phoenix, Arizona from November through March, and year-round in Santa Maria, California.  Pure Pacific organic broccoli is grown in Salinas and Santa Maria, California from April though November and in Phoenix, Arizona from November through April.

BRUSSELS SPROUTS

These walnut-sized sprouts are named after the city in Belgium where they were cultivated in the 16th century. Brussels sprouts are a cruciferous vegetable and packed full of nutrients - including being a good source of iron. Try roasting them to bring out their savory, nutty flavor.

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how to choose

Look for Brussels sprouts that are vivid green in color and tightly compact, firm heads. Squeeze the head, it should have very little give. Avoid Brussels sprouts that have black spots or have yellow leaves. The smaller the sprout the more tender and flavorful. 

available packs

how to prepare

Wash the Brussels sprouts and pat dry. Remove the buds from the stalk with a small knife. Discard any loose or discolored surface leaves. Wash thoroughly. Cut a small X in the stem end of each sprout, to help ensure the interior cooks in the same amount of time as the exterior.


 

how to store

If the Brussels sprouts are still on the stalk, remove the sprouts before storing but leave the outer leaves intact. Store in the refrigerator in a plastic bag, loosely closed, and they will last about a week. Blanch before freezing for a longer term option.


where we grow

We grow our loose Brussels sprouts using the conventional growing method year round in Salinas and Santa Maria, California, June though January and in Yuma, Arizona from December through May.  Our conventionally grown Brussels sprout stalks are available September through April from Salinas and Santa Maria, California as well as Yuma, Arizona.

BUTTER LEAF LETTUCE

Also known as butterhead, Boston, and Bibb lettuce - butter leaf lettuce has a soft, buttery texture with a sweet, mild flavor. Heads form in a small, round, loose shape and they are rich in calcium, potassium and vitamins.

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how to choose

When looking for butter leaf lettuce, choose heads where the leaves are loose and bright green in color. Avoid heads that show signs of wilting, or have yellow/brown discoloration.

how to prepare

Wash before using. The leaves of butter leaf lettuce are often fragile, so wait to dress them until right before serving.

 

how to store

Butter leaf lettuce is fragile and the leaves can wilt quickly. Store washed and dried lettuce in the refrigerator in a perforated bag for up to five days.

where we grow

We grow butter leaf lettuce year round using the conventional growing method in Salinas and Santa Maria, California from April through December and in Yuma, Arizona from December through March.

CABBAGE

Cabbage belongs to the cruciferous family and is related to cauliflower, broccoli and Brussels sprouts. This hardy vegetable has heads that are are tight with thick, veined leaves and packed full of nutrients. Cabbage is an incredibly versatile ingredient - shifting in flavor in texture depending on how you prepare it.

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how to choose

Pick heads that are tight and feel heavy for their size. Look for heads with shiny, compact leaves. Avoid cabbage with any discoloration, cracks, bruises, or blemishes.

how to prepare

Discard outer leaves if loose or limp, cut into quarters, then wash. Remove the hard core in the center then chop or finely shred the leaves. Note: To achieve tastiest results, sightly saute, boil or stir-fry.  Overcooking cabbage can intensify its strong odor and a limp texture. 

 

how to store

Whole cabbages will keep in a cool, well-ventilated place for two weeks. Cover cut cabbage in plastic wrap and store in the crisper section of the fridge for up to two days. For best results, leave the heads whole, and don't wash or cut them until you're ready to prep.

where we grow

Cabbage, that is grow using the conventional growing method, comes from Phoenix, Arizona from December through May.  Our Pure Pacific organic cabbage comes from Salinas, California from July through September and then is grown in Scottsdale, Arizona from November through April.

CARROTS

Carrots are a root vegetable that are both versatile and nutritious. They are rich in vitamin A, stocked in fiber, and provide an excellent resource for vitamins B, C, D and E. They have a crunchy texture and a sweet taste.

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how to choose

Good quality carrots should be well-shaped with firm, smooth exteriors. Color should be vibrant orange to orange-red. The deeper the orange-color, the more beta-carotene is present in the carrot. Avoid carrots that are excessively cracked or forked as well as those that are limp or rubbery.

available packs

how to prepare

Wash carrot roots and gently scrub them with a vegetable brush right before eating or preparing.

 

how to store

To minimize the amount of moisture lost, store them in the coolest part of the refrigerator in a plastic bag or wrapped in a paper towel. If properly stored, fresh whole carrots will last in your refrigerator five weeks and baby carrots will last four weeks.

where we grow

Our carrots, that are grow using the conventional growing method, come from Phoenix, Arizona from December through June and are sold under the Rousseau Farming Company label.  Our Pure Pacific organic carrots are grown year round in Phoenix, Arizona.

CAULIFLOWER

Bok choy is also known as Chinese cabbage and pak-choi. The name originates from Cantonese dialect and literally means ”white vegetable.” The whole plant is edible and has a cabbage-like flavor with sweet undertones.

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how to choose

Cauliflower should have creamy white, compact curds in which bud clusters are not separated. Look for bright green and firmly attached leaves. Some small leaves extending through curds do not affect quality.

 

available packs

how to prepare

Rinse cauliflower under cold water right before you are ready to use it. Remove and discard the outer leaves and the stalk. Cut or break the head into florets of desired size.


 

how to store

Do not wash before you store cauliflower. To prevent moisture from developing in the curd, store with the stem down. It will keep up to one week if stored uncooked in a paper or plastic bag in the refrigerator.

where we grow

Our cauliflower is available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Salinas, California, April through November, in Phoenix, Arizona from December through March, and year-round in Santa Maria, California.  Pure Pacific organic cauliflower is grown in Salinas, California, December through March, in Yuma, Arizona from November through March, and year-round in Santa Maria, California.

CELERY

Celery belongs to the parsley family - the same family as carrots, cumin and parsley. They are succulent with a crisp and crunchy texture. Celery is made up of almost 95% water making it an excellent staple in a low calorie diet

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how to choose

Look for celery stalks that are well formed and straight with rigid ribs. Ribs should snap crisply when pulled apart. Inside surface of ribs should be smooth. Leaves should be pale to bright green in color, and show no signs of wilting.

 

how to prepare

To clean celery, cut off the base and leaves, then wash stalks under running water. The outside of the stalk can be peeled with a vegetable peeler to remove the tougher and stringy parts of the celery.

 

how to store

Celery has a high water content and has a tendency to wilt quickly. It should not be kept at room temperature for too long. To regain crispness: If the celery sticks are still on the head, cut the bottom off and separate them. If they are already removed, trim the bottom part off each piece of celery. Then, stand them up in a bowl of cold water.

where we grow

Our celery is available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Salinas, California July through December, in Santa Maria, California from May through December, in Yuma, Arizona December through March, and in Scottsdale, Arizona from March through May.  Pure Pacific organic celery grows in Salinas, California from June through November, in Santa Maria, California from May through December, in Scottsdale, Arizona from March through May, and in Mexico from December through March.

CHARD

Chard, also known as Swiss chard, is a leafy green vegetable in the same family as beets and spinach. It is recognized by its succulent wrinkled leaves and brightly colored stems. Chard is available in a many different varieties - green, red, or rainbow - which are distinguished by the color of their stems. Although their stems differ in color, they all provide similar nutrition and have identical flavor.

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how to choose

Select chard with stems that are firm, crisp and unblemished and with leaves that are tender and dark green in color. Avoid bunches that are dried out or starting to turn brown.

how to prepare

Rinse well before use. Cut about a half inch off the bottom of the stem. Prepare the stems and leaves separately. The stems are tougher than the leaves and require longer cooking time. Chard leaves can be served raw or cooked.

 

how to store

Chard should be pat dry and can be stored in a plastic bag in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

 

where we grow

We offer organic chard is year round. It is grown in Salinas, California from May through October and in Scottsdale, Arizona from November through April.

CILANTRO

Cilantro is a bright and citrusy herb that is one of the most widely eaten herbs in the world. All parts of the plant are edible. Cilantro has delicate, lacy green leaves and a sharp and spicy aroma.

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how to choose

Choose fresh, vibrant, evenly-colored dark green leaves with firm stems. The cilantro should show no signs of wilting or discoloration.  These lacy leaves are extremely fragrant.

 

how to prepare

Wash the cilantro before chopping. Submerge the leaves in a bowl of water, holding onto the stems. Shake off the excess water and pat dry with a paper towel. Some recipes call for the use of the stems, but generally, cut these off and discard before chopping. Using a chef’s knife, finely chop the cilantro by rocking the knife back and forth. Be careful not to over-chop or the cilantro will start to turn black. 
Cilantro will add great flavor to your dishes with its distinctive flavor. It is a staple in most Latin, Indian and Asian cooking.



 

how to store

To store cilantro, place the cut ends in a jar of water and cover the leaves loosely with a plastic bag, then place in the refrigerator where it should keep for about 2 weeks. Snip off leaves as you need them and re-cover. Change the water every few days. Rinse the cilantro just before using.

where we grow

Our cilantro is available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Salinas and Santa Maria, California, April through November, and in Scottsdale, Arizona from December through March.  Pure Pacific organic cilantro is grown in Salinas, California, May through November, and in Scottsdale, Arizona from November through April.

GREEN ONIONS

Green onions are young shoots of the bulb onions. They have a small, white base with long, dark green, hollow tube-like stalks. Both the white and green parts are edible. Green onions have a sweeter, milder taste than the larger onion bulb, and adapt well to many different cuisines and seasons.

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how to choose

Look for green onions with green, crisp tops and firm white ends. Avoid onions with wilted tops, that are discolored or decaying.

 

how to prepare

Wash green onions in a sink of cool water. Trim the roots and about two inches off tops and discard. Chop the remaining piece - both the white part and green part can be eaten - and enjoy in a saute or salad.



 

how to store

Do not rinse green onions until right before use. Remove any rubber bands and damaged leaves, then refrigerate them in a tightly closed plastic bag up to one week. Store away from odor sensitive foods as they will absorb the odor of the onion.

where we grow

Our cilantro is available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Salinas and Santa Maria, California, April through November, and in Scottsdale, Arizona from December through March.  Pure Pacific organic cilantro is grown in Salinas, California, May through November, and in Scottsdale, Arizona from November through April.

KALE

Kale is a non-heading, leafy vegetable that is part of the cabbage family. It comes in a range of colors - the most standard of which is green, although it is also available in red and Lacinato (black.) Kale has a earthy flavor with a nutty sweetness that is intensified when cooked.

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how to choose

The smaller the leaf, the more tender and the flavor is mild - although it grows stronger the longer it is stored. Look for plump, crisp, unwilted kale, free of blemishes and holes. Avoid kale that is yellowed or brown or is limp.

 

how to prepare

Wash kale thoroughly It is hardy and fibrous when fully mature, yet tender enough to be used as a raw salad green when young. The pale green stems are tough and should be removed, while the tightly curled leaves are chewy yet succulent.



 

how to store

Kale develops a stronger flavor the longer it is stored, so most people use it within a day or two of purchase. Wrap the unwashed kale in damp paper towels, then store in a plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper.

where we grow

Our kale is available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Salinas, California from April through June, in Santa Maria, California from April through January, and in Phoenix, Arizona from November through March.  Pure Pacific organic cilantro is grown in Salinas, California from May through October, in Santa Maria, California from April through November, and in Scottsdale, Arizona from November through April.

KOHLRABI

Kohlrabi is an unusual-looking vegetable that - although it looks like a root vegetable - actually grows above ground. It’s name is German for “cabbage turnip” and the whole plant including both the bulb and the greens are edible. The flesh of the bulb is creamy white with a crisp texture and it has a mild nutty and sweet flavor with a hint of radish spice.

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how to choose

The smaller the leaf, the more tender and the flavor is mild - although it grows stronger the longer it is stored. Look for plump, crisp, unwilted kale, free of blemishes and holes. Avoid kale that is yellowed or brown or is limp.

 

how to prepare

Wash kale thoroughly It is hardy and fibrous when fully mature, yet tender enough to be used as a raw salad green when young. The pale green stems are tough and should be removed, while the tightly curled leaves are chewy yet succulent.



 

how to store

Kale develops a stronger flavor the longer it is stored, so most people use it within a day or two of purchase. Wrap the unwashed kale in damp paper towels, then store in a plastic bag, in the refrigerator crisper.

where we grow

Our kale is available year round. We grow using the conventional growing method in Salinas, California from April through June, in Santa Maria, California from April through January, and in Phoenix, Arizona from November through March.  Pure Pacific organic cilantro is grown in Salinas, California from May through October, in Santa Maria, California from April through November, and in Scottsdale, Arizona from November through April.